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REEF FISH GEAR RULES


NEW rules for the State and Federal waters of the Gulf of Mexico will require all commercial fishers and recreational anglers fishing for any Gulf reef fish species to use circle hooks, dehooking devices and venting tools. The new rules become effective on the 1st June 2008 in all waters of the Gulf of Mexico and effect all reef species including groupers, snappers, amberjacks, triggerfish, porgies, sea bass, hogfish and tilefish.

The intention of these new rules is to help conserve fishery resources by minimizing mortality associated with releasing fish that are not to be harvested due to regulations or for other reasons. Fishers and anglers are being asked to be responsible to acquire and use the required gear when fishing for reef species. FWC Law Enforcement Officers will be taking an educational approach toward enforcement before and after implementation of the rules. Additionally common sense should be used in abiding by these rules. For instance if a hook is too far embedded in the throat or gut of the fish, it is much better to cut the line from the hook rather than try to remove the hook using a dehooking device. The non stainless steel hooks will disintegrate in a relatively short period of time and should cause the fish less harm. Also, fish should only be vented after one or more of the following characteristics are noticed on a fish: the stomach protrudes from the mouth, the eyes are bulging, the belly region is swollen, or the intestines are sticking out of the anus.

CIRCLE HOOKS

The new rules require fishers on all vessels fishing for reef fish in the Gulf of Mexico to possess and use non stainless steel circle hooks when natural baits are used. A circle hook is a fishing hook designed and manufactured so that the point is not offset, but turned perpendicularly back to the shank to form a generally clear oval shape.

DEHOOKING DEVICES

The new rules require fishers on all vessels fishing for reef fish in the Gulf of Mexico to possess and use dehooking devices to remove hooks embedded in Gulf Reef fish with minimal damage. The dehooking device must be constructed to allow the hook to be secured and the barb shielded without re-engaging during removal process. It must be blunt and all edges rounded, and it must be of  a size appropriate to secure the range of hook sizes and styles used in the Gulf reef fishery.

 


 

VENTING TOOLS

The new rules require fishers on all vessels fishing for reef fish in the Gulf of Mexico to possess and use venting tools to deflate the swim bladders of Gulf reef fish to help release the fish with minimum damage. This tool must be a sharpened, hollow instrument, such as a hypodermic syringe with a plunger removed of a 16 gauge needle fixed to a hollow wooden dowel. A tool such as a knife or an ice pick may not be used. The venting tool must be inserted into the fish at a 45 degree angle approximately 1 to 2 inches from the base of the pectoral fin and inserted just deep enough to release the gases so that the fish may be released with minimum damage.

DO NOT CUT OR PUNCTURE WHAT IS POSSIBLE PROTRUDING FROM A FISHES MOUTH....it's the STOMACH!

The Novak Venting Tool, designed and developed by Florida Sea Grant in cooperation with Mote Marine Laboratory researchers, can be purchased from Aquatic Release Conservation, Inc. (www.dehooker4ARC.com), or by calling its toll free number, 1-877-411-4272.

It is also possible to make your own venting tool. The modified hypodermic needle pictured is an excellent choice for a fish venting tool. A hollow, sharpened stainless steel cannula mounted on a hollow wooden dowel also works. Cannulas (16-gauge recommended) can often be purchased from farm supply and feed stores. The tool should be cleaned between uses and kept in a safe and accessible place. Alcohol or Chlorine bleach is a good disinfectant. Be sure to cap or place a cork on the tip of the tool after use to prevent personal injury.


A GUIDE TO RELEASING REEF FISH WITH RUPTURED SWIM BLADDERS
Proper release of marine fishes has become increasingly important to anglers. In order to maintain healthy fish populations, each angler is responsible for carefully handling fish that are hooked, and releasing fish that are not harvested so they can spawn or perhaps be caught again.

Reef fish may require special handling during release to decrease mortality. This information is based on the best available research regarding reef fish venting as interpreted by a Florida Sea Grant Advisory Panel assembled to review this research. Although the authors realize the need for further study of the influence of venting on long-term reef fish survival, sufficient information exists to warrant providing guidelines to assist anglers in successful release practices.

The Problem
grouper with organs picture
Many marine reef fish have a gas-filled organ called a swim bladder, which controls buoyancy and allows the fish to maintain a certain depth in the water column. The gas in the swim bladder can over-expand when fish are brought quickly to the surface by hook and line. This can result in serious injury to the fish, and if released in this buoyant condition, the fish may float away and die from exposure to the elements or become an easy target for predators. This defeats the purpose of fishery management laws such as minimum size restrictions and daily bag limits.

Swim bladder Biology
Many reef fish have a closed swim bladder, an internal organ filled with gases, mostly oxygen, carbon everted stomach and distended intestines picturedioxide, and nitrogen. This organ is located in the peritoneal cavity attached to the fish’s backbone beneath the dorsal fin. Swim bladders can expand only so far before they burst. When the swim bladder bursts, the swim bladder gases escape into the fish’s body cavity, where they can continue to expand. The pressure exerted by these gases is sufficient to push the stomach out the mouth and the intestines out of the anus. Venting releases these gases from the body cavity, thus eliminating the pressure on the internal organs. If damage is not excessive, the organs will return in place on their own, once the gases are expelled. Venting also will allow the fish to overcome buoyancy problems and swim down to habitat depth, enhancing its immediate survival.

Determining Which Fish to Vent
Scientific studies have shown that species with large swim bladders such as red grouper, black sea bass, and gag derive immediate benefit from venting. Your ability to judge which fish should be vented will improve with practice and experience. After reeling in a fish, closely observe its condition. If the fish is bloated and floats (is unable to control its buoyancy) or if the fish’s stomach is distended out of the mouth, the fish should be vented. If the fish appears normal, not bloated, and is able to swim down to habitat depth on its own, venting is not necessary.

Venting Procedureventing process picture 1

It is best to vent the fish as quickly as possible with a minimum of handling. If the fish’s stomach is everted out of the fish’s mouth, do not attempt to push it back into the fish’s body. Expelling the swim bladder gases will allow the stomach to venting process picture 2return to its normal position within a few hours. Hold the fish gently but firmly on its side and insert the venting tool at a 45-degree angle approximately one to two inches back from the base of the pectoral fin. Only insert the tool deep enough to release the gases — do not skewer the fish. The sound of the escaping gas is audible and deflation is noticeable. If a fish is extremely bloated, use the hand holding the fish to exert gentle pressure on the fish’s abdomen to aid deflation.

Keep a good grip on the venting tool during the entire process, so that an unexpected jerk from the fish does not dislodge the tool and cause injury to others. 

The fish’s everted stomach should not be punctured. This practice is not as efficient in releasing gas from the body cavity and results in additional injury.

Return the fish to the water as soon as possible. If necessary, revive it by holding the fish with the head pointed downward and moving the fish back and forth to pass water over the gills until the fish is able to swim unassisted

FISH SURVIVAL GUIDELINES

Fishing laws are designed to maintain a desirable spawning stock size to ensure adequate future recruitment of juvenile fish. Compliance with fishing laws is essential for sustaining U.S. sport and commercial fisheries. When compliance means releasing a fish, follow these guidelines to improve its survival.

  • Have a plan for releasing a fish before landing it. Because time is crucial in keeping a released fish alive, work quickly and in concert with others on board for quick releases.
  • Avoid using gaffs and landing nets if possible.
  • Handle the fish as little as possible and try to keep the fish in the water.
  • Handle the fish with wet hands, wet gloves or a wet towel to avoid removing the beneficial fish slime and be sure to avoid damaging the gills and eyes.
  • Back hooks out using pliers or cut the leader as close to the hook as possible on throat-hooked fish. Use hooks which rapidly degrade in saltwater.
  • Revive an exhausted fish in the water by passing water over the fish's gills by using a gentle back and forth swimming motion until the fish recovers.

This research, conducted by scientists in the Fisheries Biology Program at the Center for Fisheries Enhancement, Mote Marine Laboratory, was sponsored by NOAA, Office of Sea Grant, Department of Commerce, under Grant Number NA36RG-0070.

Information on this page is based on the best available research regarding reef fish venting as interpreted by a Florida Sea Grant Advisory Panel assembled to review this research. Although the authors realize the need for further study of the influence of venting on long term reef fish survival, sufficient information exists to warrant providing guidelines to assist anglers in successful release practices.



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